Contest

MakaylaEdwardMachinesmall

If you’ve seen my past posts, you will recognize this photo from Bannack and my Fine Art print. This photo is almost unedited. I used a mask to slightly tone down the bright lighting from the window, I slightly sharpened part of the machine for printing purposes, and I eliminated a red dot that was on the machine wheel. I love window lighting, how the machine is almost silhouetted, and the side of the organ that is hidden in the shadows.

My college’s on-campus visual society offered the print cash contest called Memories. While I have no memories of Bannack or sewing machines, the photo perfectly fits the theme regardless. Sometimes it’s not about what you think about a piece of art, but what you make other people think about when they look at it.

http://visualsociety.org/

Contest entered July 13, 2016.

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Final Photobook

Surprisingly, compiling and organizing my photobook was the least stressful activity or project I’ve had in COMM 300. Considering my lack of previous experience in photography, I think I’ve made great progress. I understand now that photography is unique and useful because it’s artistic and practical. A photography class can enrich anybody’s life.

This was my first time using My Publisher. Long story short, the process was relatively easy to follow and I was satisfied with my printed book. I can take my photobook into an interview proudly and demonstrate the skills I have acquired as a Visual Communication major.

Cover

Click here to view my whole photobook. MakaylaEdwardPhotobook

Fine Art Print

This is the photo I chose to print at 16×24. My video explains the process behind this photo. Edits were very minimal. They were a Black&White adjustment layer to discolor a red dot (as you can see on the machine in the original photo), a mask on that B&W layer, and (I forgot to say in the video) slight sharpening on parts of the machine to compensate for sharpness lost in printing.

MakaylaEdwardMachinesmall

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Original photo

A video explaining the process, with me holding the actual print.